Page 1 of 1

After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:45 pm
by Euan McLean
As I live in Toowoomba I have seen many "scored" waterways (cleaner and deeper) after the "Toowoomba Tsumani". What would Peter's recommendation be to restore them?
Waterways through the "paddocks / countryside" I mean. As they are now aren't they just better salt drains?

Re: After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:08 pm
by ColinJEly
Euan

As they say in the classics; 'WWJD?' (What Would Jesus Do?) In other words, I suppose this sort of thing has happened since time immemorial, every time we have had a large rain event, what was done then? What happened when 'we' weren't here to do anything?

Re: After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:02 pm
by Shirley Henderson
Hello Euan, Have you read any of Peters books. It sounds like you have a huge task in front of you. Why dont you contact Peter direct?
Shirley

Re: After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:05 am
by duane
Col in answer to your question
WWJD?
I suppose this sort of thing has happened since time immemorial (sic), every time we have had a large rain event, what was done then? What happened when 'we' weren't here to do anything?
I haven't a clue what JC would have done BUT I can tell you how the Australian landscape once dealt with such flooding and much of that is in Peter's two books and in the following article.

Click onto http://kravcik.blog.sme.sk/c/255048/A-r ... sters.html

Dr Michal Kravcik is the lead author of the book Water: The New Paradigm.

Re: After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:10 pm
by andy
That link to Dr. Michael Kravcik's blog is a beauty!
It is a great visual explanation of water cycling that even i can understand.
I remember first reading about the short water cycle and the value of dew in the book "The Greening of the Hill", by Horace Webber.
The story of Broken Hill, which had had it's surrounding countryside denuded for mine operations,wood fuel for smelting,etc. Broken Hill suffered badly from summer dust storms, drought and drifting sands.
In the late 1930's an amateur botanist called Albert Morris approached the mining companies about enclosing the town common to allow natural regeneration,therby encircling the town with a wide strip of vegetation.It was to be coupled with plantings of indigenous trees and shrubs to protect the then new mine operations.
He was called a madman by many townsfolk. ( sound familiar? )
It proceeded and living conditions in the town improved dramatically....
Just strikes me as a great practical example of how landscapes can recover when plant life and water cycling is restored. And this all took place over 70 years ago.
cheers

Re: After the flood, what for the waterways?

Posted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 8:42 am
by duane
Andy

The recoupling of the carbon and water cycles by using plants to cool and recover daily water (dew) is the way to recover and moderate, climate conditions.

Trees/plants, acting as daily air conditioners, modify the diurnal temperatures -as cited by your Broken Hill example- that evapotranspired water, if conditions are right, when it recondenses, warm the night (somewhere).

Its all about CYCLING.....not about removing plants eg., willows for instance. Plants......all plants make a difference by turning the Sun's energy into latent heat (COOLING).

Good post Andy.....now you should read Water for the Recovery of Climate by Michal Kravcik and see the post where he and Willy Ripl are coming to Australia in May.

You can register and hear them at Sydney Uni.